Difference between revisions of "Cooling slurry"

From NOWA-CL
Jump to navigation Jump to search
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
Cooling slurries are combinations of solute and solvent which are frigorific.
+
Cooling slurries are combinations of solute and solvent which are frigorific and are often used as a cooling bath.
 
==Water==
 
==Water==
 
{|class=wikitable sortable
 
{|class=wikitable sortable
Line 15: Line 15:
 
!Initial Temperature (°C)
 
!Initial Temperature (°C)
 
!Solute
 
!Solute
!Amount (% solvent)
+
!Amount (% solute)
 
!Final Temperature (°C)
 
!Final Temperature (°C)
 
|-
 
|-
Line 39: Line 39:
 
|+Ice-Based Cooling Slurries<ref name=Gordon/>
 
|+Ice-Based Cooling Slurries<ref name=Gordon/>
 
!Solute
 
!Solute
!Amount (% solvent)
+
!Amount (% solute)
 
!Final Temperature (&deg;C)
 
!Final Temperature (&deg;C)
 
|-
 
|-

Latest revision as of 21:36, 15 January 2020

Cooling slurries are combinations of solute and solvent which are frigorific and are often used as a cooling bath.

Water

Water-Based Cooling Slurries[1]
Initial Temperature (°C) Solute Amount (% solute) Final Temperature (°C)
10.7 sodium acetate 85 -4.7
13.3 ammonium chloride 30 -5.1
13.2 sodium nitrate 75 -5.3
10.7 sodium thiosulfate 110 -8
10.8 potassium iodide 140 -11.7
20 ammonium nitrate 106 -4
13.6 60 -13.6
13.2 ammonium thiocyanide pentahydrate 133 -18.0

Ice

Ice-Based Cooling Slurries[1]
Solute Amount (% solute) Final Temperature (°C)
sodium carbonate 20 -2
potassium chloride 30 -10.9
ammonium chloride 25 -15.4
ammonium nitrate 45 -16.8
sodium chloride 33 -21.3
sodium bromide 66 -28
magnesium chloride 85 -34
sulfuric acid (66.2%) 23 -25
40 -30
91 -37
calcium chloride hexahydrate 41 -9
81 -21.5
123 -40.3
143 -55

Dry Ice

Dry-Iced based Cooling Slurries[2]
Solute Amount (% solvent) Final Temperature (°C)

Liquid Nitrogen

Liquid Nitrogen Based Cooling Baths[3]
Solute Amount (% solvent) Final Temperature (°C)

See Also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 -Gordon, Arnold J.; Ford, Richard A. (1972) "Solvents and Baths for Heating and Cooling".
    The Chemists's Companion, A Handbook of Practical Data, Techniques, and References John Wiley & Sons
    ISBN: 978-0471315902
  2. Phipps, A. M.; Hume, D. N. (1968) "General purpose low temperature dry-ice baths"
    Journal of Chemical Education 45(10); pp664. 
    DOI:10.1021/ed045p664
    link courtesy American Chemical Society.
  3. Rondeau, Roger E. (1966) "Slush Baths"
    Journal of Chemical Engineering Data 11(1); pp124. 
    DOI:10.1021/je60028a037
    link courtesy American Chemical Society.